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Top 15 Worst Shark Tank Products

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We’ve seen a lot of products and pitches on Shark Tank till now. And even if some weren’t as good as others, they still had good ideas and motivations behind them. 

But now, we seem to have taken a dark turn here, as we are now about to go through a few of the WORST shark tank products up to date. We may not cover them all, but after you see them, you’ll probably think about how the sharks were feeling when they saw them.

Index:

Licki brush

Ok, we are now entering bad product territory. Hold on to your cats for the first product, the Licki Brush! this product is so-o dumb it’s not even funny, but that depends on the kind of pet person you are. This pet-loving duo, Tara and Jason O’Mara came into the tank asking for $300k for 15%, for a brush that you put in your mouth to lick your cat.

Yeah, no shark would have EVER wanted to invest in this anyway, and they didn’t, so let’s move to the next one.

I Want to Draw a Cat for You

For our Second item, I’d like to ask you something.  Would you pay $10 for a drawing that looks like it’s been done by a 5-year-old, just to compete with someone else?

Steve Gadlin tried to answer this question with his product “I want to draw a cat for you”, and with his remarkable dance, managed to get a laugh from the sharks if not an investment of $10k for 15%.

Ionic ear

Oh, the horror! thinking about these products is even worse than writing about them, so you’re fine, even if I’m not. The next nightmare on shark tank was the ionic ear, a Bluetooth headset that … wait for it… had to be surgically implanted under your ear in order to be used.

Darrin Johnson, the founder, walked away with no deal, as any sane shark would not have invested. Ionic Ear is a product that was pitched on the television show Shark Tank in 2009. The product is a wireless earpiece that is designed to be worn inside the ear, providing clear and uninterrupted sound.

During the pitch, the founder, Andrew Austin, explained that Ionic Ear was designed to be a revolutionary new way to listen to music, take phone calls, and enjoy audio content without the inconvenience of wires or bulky headphones. He demonstrated the product by showing how it worked and explained how it was designed to be comfortable and easy to use.

The sharks were initially interested in the product, but had concerns about the practicality and marketability of the product. Some of the sharks raised concerns about the potential market size, as the product seemed too niche, while others questioned the effectiveness of the product and its ability to compete with existing headphones on the market.

In the end, Ionic Ear did not receive an investment from the sharks. While the concept of a wireless earpiece might be appealing to some, the sharks were hesitant to invest in a product that they felt was too niche and had limited market potential. Ionic Ear is no longer available for purchase and has not become a commercial success.

The Sullivan generator

This would have been so much better if the founder had not brought it to the tank at all. Mark Sullivan comes to the tank, asking $ 1 million for a 40% stake in his idea, a hurricane generator that somehow produces gold. Don’t even ask, no shark invested.

During the pitch, Sullivan claimed that the Sullivan Generator was a new type of hydroelectric generator that could generate clean energy by harnessing the power of moving water. He also claimed that the device was scalable and could be used in a wide range of applications, from powering homes to generating electricity for remote villages.

However, the sharks were skeptical of Sullivan’s claims and the effectiveness of the device. They raised concerns about the cost-effectiveness and practicality of the generator, as well as the lack of concrete data and testing to support Sullivan’s claims.

In the end, none of the sharks were willing to invest in the Sullivan Generator. While the concept of generating clean energy from water is certainly appealing, the sharks ultimately felt that there were too many unanswered questions and uncertainties surrounding the device to make it a worthwhile investment.

Pavlok

This product by Maneesh Sethi wasn’t a bad product, but what made it worse was the pitch. He struts into the tank, asking $500k for a 3.14% stake, for a wristwatch that jolts you so don’t pick your nose, among other things.

He didn’t do any studies to prove that his product was useful and just used observations from other studies instead. Mark and Kevin had some things to say to him before he left empty-handed.

During the pitch, Sethi explained that Pavlok was designed to use operant conditioning principles to help users break bad habits. He demonstrated the device by showing how it could be used to help someone quit smoking or stop biting their nails. The sharks were intrigued by the concept, but raised concerns about the safety and effectiveness of the device.

Mark Cuban, one of the sharks, expressed skepticism about the shock therapy and asked if the device had been tested by a medical professional. Sethi replied that the device had been tested by psychologists and behavior change experts. Other sharks, such as Kevin O’Leary, questioned the scalability of the product and the ability to sell it to a mass market.

Pavlok faced criticism and controversy over its use of electric shocks for behavior modification. Some experts raised concerns about the safety and efficacy of the device, and some users reported negative experiences with the shocks. The company has since pivoted to focus on other types of habit-breaking techniques, such as positive reinforcement and cognitive behavioral therapy.

Skinny Mirror

This product is just plain bad as it is preying on people’s mentality of thinking that they are fat. 

She tried really hard to market it to the sharks, but they didn’t really like it. Belinda jasmine brought this product to the shark tank, asking $200k for 20% of the company. As expected, she didn’t get a deal.

During the pitch, Jasmine explained that the Skinny Mirror was designed to boost people’s confidence by making them feel better about their appearance. She demonstrated the product by showing how it could make people look up to 10 pounds slimmer. The sharks were skeptical of the product, questioning whether it was ethical to create an artificial image of oneself that did not reflect reality.

Mark Cuban, one of the sharks, expressed concern about the potential backlash from customers who might feel deceived by the product. He also questioned the scalability of the product, as it would likely be difficult to sell to retailers who might feel uncomfortable carrying a product that could be seen as promoting unrealistic body standards.

See also  Quevos Shark Tank Update

Ultimately, none of the sharks made an offer to invest in the Skinny Mirror. While the concept of creating a slimming optical illusion might be appealing to some, the sharks were hesitant to invest in a product that they felt could be seen as misleading or unethical.

Wake n Bacon

Someone just thought that the smell of cooking bacon would be enough to wake someone up. That someone was Matty Sallin with wake n bacon. the founder came in a $200k ask for 20%, may not have got it though.

During the pitch, the inventor, Matty Sallin, explained that Wake n Bacon was designed to help people wake up more easily and start their day with a delicious breakfast. The sharks were initially intrigued by the concept, but had concerns about the practicality and safety of the product.

Some of the sharks raised concerns about the potential fire hazards associated with cooking bacon in bed, while others questioned the scalability of the product and the potential market size. In the end, none of the sharks were willing to invest in Wake n Bacon, as they felt that the risks and challenges associated with the product outweighed the potential rewards.

While Wake n Bacon did not receive an investment from the sharks, the product gained a lot of attention and became popular on social media. However, it ultimately did not become a commercial success, and the product is no longer available for purchase.

Sticky notes holder

Mary Ellen Simonsen put forward her idea of sticky notes that can be attached to a computer screen for $ 1 million for 20%, but the sharks weren’t feeling it.

Squirrel Boss

This product’s purpose, given to it by its founder, Michael Desanti, asking $1.4million for 20%,  was to keep squirrels away from birdfeeders by jolting them, which raises some concerns about animal cruelty, so the sharks didn’t invest, and I have no idea how it would differentiate between birds and squirrels.

During the pitch, the inventor, Michael Desanti, explained that Squirrel Boss was designed to help bird lovers who were frustrated with squirrels stealing food from their bird feeders. He demonstrated the product by showing how it worked and explained how it was designed to be safe for both squirrels and humans.

The sharks were initially interested in the product, but had concerns about the potential backlash from animal rights activists and the potential for negative publicity. Some of the sharks also questioned the scalability of the product and the potential market size.

In the end, none of the sharks were willing to invest in Squirrel Boss. While the concept of a bird feeder that could keep squirrels away might be appealing to some, the sharks were hesitant to invest in a product that they felt could be seen as cruel or inhumane. Squirrel Boss is still available for purchase, but it has not become a commercial success.

UroClub:

A golf club that doubles as a portable urinal. Although Uroclub was marketed as a discreet way for golfers to relieve themselves on the course, it was widely panned as a disgusting and impractical product.

During the pitch, the inventor, Dr. Floyd Seskin, explained that UroClub was designed to help golfers who were uncomfortable or unable to use public restrooms on the golf course. He demonstrated the product by showing how it worked and explained how it was designed to be discreet and easy to use.

The sharks were initially interested in the product, but had concerns about the practicality and hygiene of the product. Some of the sharks raised concerns about the potential for the product to leak or spill, while others questioned the scalability of the product and the potential market size.

In the end, none of the sharks were willing to invest in UroClub. While the concept of a discreet urine container might be appealing to some golfers, the sharks were hesitant to invest in a product that they felt was too niche and could potentially be seen as unsanitary. UroClub is still available for purchase, but it has not become a commercial success.

Throx:

Three socks sold together as a set, in case you lose one. The idea was that you would always have a spare sock, but it didn’t catch on with consumers. The product is a set of three socks sold together, designed to solve the problem of losing a sock in the laundry.

During the pitch, the founder, Edwin Heaven, explained that Throx was designed to help people who were constantly losing one sock in the laundry, forcing them to throw out the other sock and buy a new pair. He demonstrated the product by showing how it worked and explained how it was designed to be practical and convenient.

The sharks were initially intrigued by the concept, but had concerns about the practicality and marketability of the product. Some of the sharks raised concerns about the potential market size, as the product seemed too niche, while others questioned the scalability of the business.

In the end, Throx did not receive an investment from the sharks. While the concept of a set of three socks might be appealing to some, the sharks were hesitant to invest in a product that they felt was not scalable and had limited market potential. Throx is still available for purchase, but it has not become a commercial success.

CitiKitty:

A product designed to help train cats to use the toilet instead of a litter box. While some people have had success with this method, many others found it difficult to implement and messy.

During the pitch, the founder, Rebecca Rescate, explained that CitiKitty was designed to help cat owners save money and eliminate the need for litter boxes. She demonstrated the product by showing how it worked and explained how it was designed to be easy to use and effective.

The sharks were initially interested in the product, but had concerns about the practicality and marketability of the product. Some of the sharks raised concerns about the potential market size, as the product seemed too niche, while others questioned the effectiveness of the product.

In the end, CitiKitty did receive an investment from Kevin Harrington, one of the sharks, but the deal ultimately fell through after the show aired. Despite this setback, CitiKitty gained a lot of attention and became a popular product among cat owners. The product is still available for purchase and has become a commercial success, with many cat owners using it to successfully toilet train their cats.

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FAQs:

What percent of Shark Tank companies fail?

According to some sources, around 66% of Shark Tank companies fail after appearing on the show. However, it’s important to note that this figure is not an official statistic and may vary depending on how “failure” is defined.

Who turned down 30 million on Shark Tank?

Arum Kang was offered $30 million by Mark Cuban for her dating app, Coffee Meets Bagel, but she and her sisters rejected the offer. This decision led them to receive criticism from some online commentators, who called them “greedy” and “foolish.”

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